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Owen.

Any advice would be appreciated!

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Hi all! 

 

So I'm interested in learning some C++ as well as some other programming languages. Not really for anything specific other than the fact I think it would just be helpful to know these things. It also would open up for some opportunities in the future etc. I know about sites such as w3schools, this is where I learnt HTML and CSS to a certain degree. However, I'd like to have some other options in case I want to learn something more specific etc. Would also appreciate any tips on good places to get started and ways to apply what I learnt, maybe something like a starting project? Any advice or links etc to help get started with C++ would be great. :D 

 

Thanks! 

Owen.

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Hi Owen,

 

Though not a C++ programmer myself, I have dabbled with some other languages in the past. As I was interested in getting my hands dirty one day with the SDK you can find for these SCS games I did have a full read through this tutorialspoint site and found it to be a good light start just to get some understanding behind initial setup for a development environment and the general syntax of the language. tutorials point C++
In terms of learning to program in general I think it'd be useful to also look at courses around object oriented programming(OOP), design patterns (e.g. book "“Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software").

Some of the paid sites will most likely offer some more quality instructional videos to more advanced concepts and best practices for a plethora of programming languages. E.g. coursera, pluralsight, linkedin learning etc.

 

Hope this helps... 
 

bit of reassurance, if you manage to get to a point of somewhat being accustomed and comfortable about OOP and leveraging some common patterns to your own advantage learning other languages eventually becomes somewhat of a syntax learning exercise while abstract concepts generally will work regardless of the language used. Obviously each language has it's own specialisation/strong points, but you'll at least get by with most of them once you're caught up with the basics.

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On 6/8/2020 at 8:11 PM, learvlieg said:

Hi Owen,

 

Though not a C++ programmer myself, I have dabbled with some other languages in the past. As I was interested in getting my hands dirty one day with the SDK you can find for these SCS games I did have a full read through this tutorialspoint site and found it to be a good light start just to get some understanding behind initial setup for a development environment and the general syntax of the language. tutorials point C++
In terms of learning to program in general I think it'd be useful to also look at courses around object oriented programming(OOP), design patterns (e.g. book "“Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software").

Some of the paid sites will most likely offer some more quality instructional videos to more advanced concepts and best practices for a plethora of programming languages. E.g. coursera, pluralsight, linkedin learning etc.

 

Hope this helps... 
 

bit of reassurance, if you manage to get to a point of somewhat being accustomed and comfortable about OOP and leveraging some common patterns to your own advantage learning other languages eventually becomes somewhat of a syntax learning exercise while abstract concepts generally will work regardless of the language used. Obviously each language has it's own specialisation/strong points, but you'll at least get by with most of them once you're caught up with the basics.

This is really helpful, thank you so much! I'll be sure to check these sites out. I appreciate your help :D

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I see you received some great advice from someone already.

I would also recommend LinkedIn Learning and Udacity.

 

In general (for any languages): try to do little projects for yourself or for someone else (only do for someone else once you think you got enough skills). For me, doing projects helps me to test my skills and also dive alot deeper into the language I use in order to come up with (great) solutions.

 

Working on your own project can give you alot more motivation as you are your own project leader, customer and developer. You decide how the project is going to end up looking 😁.

Doing exercises from courses can also be fun, but it feels like you're being forced to do something which might decrease your motivation at some point. In case that happens, I would recommend to just change the exercise's case/topic/story to whatever you want, while still using the theory you learned from the exercise.

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6 hours ago, kerimbjk said:

I see you received some great advice from someone already.

I would also recommend LinkedIn Learning and Udacity.

 

In general (for any languages): try to do little projects for yourself or for someone else (only do for someone else once you think you got enough skills). For me, doing projects helps me to test my skills and also dive alot deeper into the language I use in order to come up with (great) solutions.

 

Working on your own project can give you alot more motivation as you are your own project leader, customer and developer. You decide how the project is going to end up looking 😁.

Doing exercises from courses can also be fun, but it feels like you're being forced to do something which might decrease your motivation at some point. In case that happens, I would recommend to just change the exercise's case/topic/story to whatever you want, while still using the theory you learned from the exercise.

This is some really helpful advice! I really appreciate it :D Thanks a lot and I'll keep it in mind when I find some time to start learning! 

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